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Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

1 edition of Peat and peatland evaluation of the Dryden-Lac Seul area found in the catalog.

Peat and peatland evaluation of the Dryden-Lac Seul area

Peat and peatland evaluation of the Dryden-Lac Seul area

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Published by Ministry of Northern Development and Mines in Toronto .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Peat - Ontario - Dryden area,
  • Peat - Ontario - Lac Seul area

  • Edition Notes

    11

    The Physical Object
    Pagination7 v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22028183M

    One exception near the present study area is Bjö rck (,). A basal bulk-sediment date of 11, AE 14 C yr BP (WIS) from Rattle Lake (Site H, Fig. 3), 15 km southwest of the Eagle. Peatland restoration goal The goal of restoration of peatlands after peat harvesting is to re-establish self-regulatory mechanisms that will lead back to a naturally functioning peat accumulating ecosystem, including its ability to accumulate peat. The restoration approach for bogs, called the moss-layer transfer technique, was developed through an extensive research program and is based on.

    The book presents a complete analysis of how peat works chemically, physically, and ecologically. much of the historic peatland area has been drained for agriculture but little is known about. The James Bay Lowlands (JBL) are a large peatland-complex that form the southeast part of the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada, the second largest peatland area in the world (, km 2) after the Western Siberian Lowlands (Riley, ; Gorham, ).

    of a whole ecosystem — Bois-des-Bel peat bog, Québec — in collaboration with several Canadian peat producers was an important source of information. The Bois-des-Bel site was restored in and is now monitored closely to study the recovery of usual peatland functions. It can be visited upon request to peat producers or the PERG. Peatland Study and Classification. By studying peatland soils, we can understand more about the history of a wetland, and the ecological processes that are occurring that allow peat to accumulate. The methods by which peatlands can be classified are immense.


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Peat and peatland evaluation of the Dryden-Lac Seul area Download PDF EPUB FB2

Purchase Peatlands, Volume 9 - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNPeat and peatland resources of northwestern Ontario. Toronto, Ont.: Ontario Ministry of Northern Development and Mines, Mines and Minerals Division, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: J L Riley; Livain Michaud.

Book Microform: Microfiche: EnglishView all editions and formats: Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first. Subjects: Peat -- Ontario, Southern. Peatlands -- Ontario, Southern.

Peat. View all subjects; More like this: Similar Items. ISBN: X OCLC Number: Notes: Six maps in pocket mounted on p. [3] of cover. Includes abstract in French. Description: ix, p. Peatlands form important landscape elements in many parts of the world and play significant roles for biodiversity and global carbon balance.

This new edition has been fully revised and updated, documenting the latest advances in areas such as microbial processes and relations between biological processes and hydrology.

Peatland Snippets (formerly Peat News) is the monthly newsletter of the International Peatland Society. It is sent by email for free to all members of the IPS via MailChimp.

If you would like to publish your news, announcements, short reports or other information in Peatland Snippets ( lines), please contact ke (at) peatlands. Peatland is a terrestrial wetland ecosystem in which the production of organic matter exceeds its decomposition and a net accumulation of peat results.

Peatlands occur in every climatic zone and continent. The total area globally is around 4 million km2 making them 70% of natural freshwater wetland or 3% of the Earth’s land surface.

Some peatland authorities consider soils with surface organic layer less than 30% also to be peat but this is debateable. This approach gives rise to larger estimates of the global area of peatland although it does not increase the carbon store appreciably.

Organic soil is differentiated according to the degree of decomposition of organic matter. The habitat requirements for peat initiation and accumulation are similar in every geographical location (waterlogging, low pH, low nutrient availability, low oxygen supply, reduced decomposition rate) but the physical and chemical characteristics differ according to specific site characteristics of landscape area and topography, climate, water depth and flow, nutrient availability and.

Definitions of peat vary across disciplines and between authorities for different purposes and there is no universal agreement that is applicable in all circumstances.

This is unfortunate because it affects estimates of the area of peatland and determination of important attributes of peat, especially volume and carbon content.

Peatlands provide globally important ecosystem services through climate and water regulation or biodiversity conservation. While covering only 3% of the earth's surface, degrading peatlands are responsible for nearly a quarter of carbon emissions from the land use sector.

Bringing together world-class experts from science, policy and practice to highlight and debate the importance. Peat is a peculiar product of waterlogged ground, and peatland is the place where peat accumulates. To date, there are no widely agreed definitions of peat and peatland, because different scholars have adopted different standards.

Peat consists of liquid, gaseous, and solid state matter, and its most important constituent is organic matter. The Dryden-Lac Seul region in western Ontario is an important commercial and tourist area containing mainly boreal forest.

A LANDSAT-4 TM scene of this region was analysed in conjunction with a. Peatlands are a type of wetlands which are among the most valuable ecosystems on Earth: they are critical for preserving global biodiversity, provide safe drinking water, minimise flood risk and help address climate change.

Peatlands are the largest natural terrestrial carbon store; the area covered by near natural peatland worldwide (>3 million km 2) sequesters gigatonnes of carbon. Tropical peatland covers about 10%–12% of the world’s total peatland area, though it stores about Gt C (Page and Rieley, ) or about one-third from the total carbon storage in peatland.

Assuming that with an average peat depth of 5 m, tropical peatland ecosystem stores ton C/ha, compared to the average of ton C/ha in. CANADA Surface area In Canada, peatlands represent 90% of the wetlands and cover approximately million hectares.

From that, 30 hectares have been or are currently harvested, which represents only % of the natural capital. Compilation of peatland areas used by the horticultural peat industry in Production Annual Canadian peat production is million [ ].

Reviewing the area of peatland and the peat reserves in different continents, it is clear that the global distribution of peat is very uneven. The peatland area in North America is the largest accounting for % of the total global peatland area, followed by Asia (%) and Europe (%).

area of peatland in Europe iskm². Mires were found to cover more thankm² (around 54 % of the total peatland area). If shallow-peat lands (peat) in European Russia are also taken into account, the total peatland area in Europe is more than 1, km2, which is almost 10 % of the total surface area.

Peatland Conservation Global evidence for the effects of interventions to conserve peatland vegetation Nigel G. Taylor, Patrick Grillas & William J. Sutherland. Peatland ecosystems are the most efficient carbon sinks in the world, which means the area stores carbon and carbon-containing substances for long periods of time.

Peatlands and their surrounding plant life work to trap the CO2 released by the decomposing peat. Peatland restoration in North America (NA) was initiated approximately 25 years ago on peat‐extracted bogs.

Recent advances in peatland restoration in NA have expanded the original concepts and methodology. We estimate total global peatland area to be million km 2, approximately % of the world land area.

Our results suggest that previous global peatland inventories are likely to underestimate peat extent in the tropics, and to overestimate it in parts of mid- and high-latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere.Peatlands cover approximately % of global land area while storing one third to one half of the world's soil carbon.

While peat erosion is a natural process it has been enhanced by human.